Unusual ways to celebrate the Day of Hungarian Culture abroad

The line-up of musical programs was opened on 19 January by the Lajos Bács Memorial Concert, broadcasted online from the Hungarian Cultural Institute of Bucharest. This event was special, as for the first time a Romanian minister of culture welcomed the Day of the Hungarian Culture. In a video message on the Facebook page of the institute, Bogdan Gheorghiou highlighted that “the late conductor is a symbolic figure of the Romanian-Hungarian relations and a mutual link between the Hungarian and the Romanian Cultural Days”.

The building of the Collegium Hungaricum in Berlin is being virtually extended by new floors - the institute’s self-developed virtual exhibition space - based on the actual interior of the institute which opens today with the exhibition of Eszter Galambos’ “Body in (Dream)Space”. The viewer in the virtual space can click on the exposed artwork to see it on a larger scale in order to get further details about it. The virtual exhibition “Timestream” by the Kossuth-prized Hungarian photographer, Péter Korniss, can be viewed in the online gallery of the Hungarian Institute of Culture in Moscow.

Péter Korniss - In the Underpass, 2014, 73x110 cm, giclée print

Péter Korniss - In the Underpass, 2014, 73x110 cm, giclée print

Along with the exhibition, the 2020 concert of the UMZE Ensemble is also projected on to the building of the Collegium Hungaricum in Berlin. This Saturday, on the anniversary of the concert, the entire recording will be available on the Facebook page and on the YouTube channel of the institute. In the Collegium Hungaricum in Vienna, young Hungarian musicians - Enikő Cseh and Dalma Sarnyai - from Young Virtuosos are being introduced on the institute’s YouTube channel.

In Stuttgart the concert of pianist Tamás Érdi, in Seoul the Korean version of the Hungarian Hymn are shared on the social media platforms of the institutes, while the festive concert in the Palace of Arts in Budapest by the Pannon Philharmonics is shared by almost every Hungarian cultural institute’s and Hungarian embassy’s social media platforms across the world.

Among the many exhibitions to open the first one is the “Light in Nature, in other words, the Sunny Landscapes of the Spirit” in the form of tapestry art by the Hungarian Tapestry Artists’ Association in the gallery of the Hungarian Institute of Culture in Tallinn. This very exhibition arrives at the Estonian capital after Rome, Zagreb, Bucharest, Sofia, Baku and Helsinki.

Still picture from Eszter Galambos's work "Between the trees"

Still picture from Eszter Galambos's work "Between the trees"

In Bratislava, a virtual variation of the memorial exhibition of “The King of Operetta from Komárom” is being presented for the occasion of the 150th anniversary of composer Ferenc Lehár’s birthday. In New York, photographer Balázs Csizik’s online exhibition “Synesthesia” starts which is a part of the Hungarian Cultural Center’s online photo exhibition series in The Big Apple.

Our film palette is broadened by short films - including the Bartók flash mob - recorded earlier by the Hungarian cultural institutes in Moscow, Brussels and London. On the Facebook page of the Hungarian Cultural Centre of Prague animated shorts are being broadcasted by Academy Awards winning animator Ferenc Rófusz.

In the Hungarian Cultural Institute of Istanbul, a pre-recorded conversation will be available with the Cultura Hungarica Prize-winning literary translator Erdal Şalikoğlu about the newly released translations of István Fekete’s youth novels (Csí, Tüskevár, Kele). The Hungarian Cultural Centre of Sepsiszentgyörgy presents their own publication titled “The Story of Mikó’s School in Székely Land”. In this book - presenting documentary photographs and momentous stories about the school - students testify how the school itself maintained national integrity throughout the generations with the help of “Mikó’s Spirit”, despite the disruption caused by the Trianon Treaty.

The festive floodlights of the Falconieri Palace, home of the Hungarian Cultural Institute in Rome.

The festive floodlights of the Falconieri Palace, home of the Hungarian Cultural Institute in Rome.

In Rome, The Falconieri Palace - home of the Hungarian Cultural Institute - gains a festive floodlight due to the Hungarian Cultural Days. In Beijing, the life and novels of famous Hungarian writers (Imre Kertész, Antal Szerb, Ferenc Molnár, István Örkény, Jenő Rejtő, Ephraim Kishon) can be viewed and read by bypassers in Chinese on tablets and screens placed in the display window of the institute. In Sofia, the institute exhibits a selection of artworks from young Hungarian graphic designers on their Facebook page.

The range of digital programs is extended by a sound recording from the Hungarian Cultural Institute of Ljubljana, which is a performance by actor Alojz Svete - from the Slovenian National Theater - who recites Szabadság, szerelem by Sándor Petőfi in Hungarian and Slovenian.