Inauguration of memorial plaque in the memory of Katalin Karády

On the occasion of the 110th anniversary of Katalin Karády's birth and the 30th anniversary of her death, in the framework of the Year of National Cohesion program series in North America the Consulate General of Hungary in New York held a commemoration with an inauguration ceremony of the former home of the actress. The place is now called the "Katalin Karády Memorial Court"

Memorial plaque of Katalin Karády

Memorial plaque of Katalin Karády

Karády was a celebrated and undeservedly neglected star of her age. His first feature film, Deadly Spring, was such a success that, after its discovery, it was revered by Hollywood stars everywhere. Every woman wanted to look and dress like her, and her hats made her iconic. With his strong, sovereign character, she captivated the hearts of both female and male viewers. In nine years, one could see her starring in about twenty films, and then World War II finally broke her career in half. At the time of the world burning, in exchange for her jewelry, she saved the lives of children of Jewish descent from execution. As she could not continue her profession in Hungary, the actress had to emigrate to the United States, where she became one of the dominant players in the North American diaspora.
On the occasion of the 110th anniversary of Katalin Karády's birth and the 30th anniversary of her death, a plaque was inaugurated in the courtyard of the house that once served the actress's home. The plaque was revealed by István Pásztor Hungarian Consul General in New York and Péter B. Nagy diplomat responsible for the diaspora. The famous actress lived on the 11th floor of a house in the former Hungarian Quarter of New York, at the corner of the 2nd Avenue and 80th Street, until her death in 1990, and the courtyard of this house is now called the "Katalin Karády Memorial Courtyard." commemorating a highly respected artist among both Hungarian and American Jews.
In 2004, under the 1953 law of the Knesset – Katalin Karády was posthumously awarded the honorary title “Righteous Among the Nations” for her heroic humanitarian acts during the II. world war.